Carl did a workshop at Staffs Uni with student nurses - carl to send photos. Introducing destiny and mobile moocs to new students. Asked students what they thought of mobile learning - live video, instant chat, should there be more video less text inside the mobile app, the optimum level of push notifications - trying to create the right amount so it’s not annoying. This is for the next phase of destiny which will be to develop the app.
Digital Skills

Destiny 2.0 In Development

17 May, 2017

As work begins on developing the next phase of the Destiny project, Carl returned to the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Staffordshire University to introduce students to the Destiny MOOCs app and mobile e-learning.

The students were asked to share their feedback and what they thought of mobile learning. This included features such as live video, instant chat, the optimum level of push notifications, and even aesthetic detail such as the ratio of video to text within the app. This feedback is valuable to the next phase of the Destiny project which will be to develop the app into something with a positive UX, with bitjam adopting agile methodology and co-production techniques to ensure frequent testing and improvement.

Working closely with the partners at Staffordshire University and students at the School of Nursing and Midwifery is an important part of the development process, encouraging active participation and keeping the project timeline on track. We recently visited the school to get feedback on the project so far, allowing the students a first glimpse at Destiny as a mobile e-learning app. Find out more here.

Co-production

A Case Study of Agile Development and Co-production in the NHS

4 May, 2017

Part three of our co-production series discusses a successful case study where an agile development framework and co-production techniques were used within the healthcare sector to improve processes and minimise disruption when moving to new systems.

“Adopting SAFe has set in motion the skill development and mindset for successful organisational change even as we scale to new programs, release trains, and people”

– Gary Dawson, Assistant Director, Solutions Delivery.

The NHS Blood and Transplant department (NHSBT) is a joint England and Wales Special Health Authority service. They deliver blood supply and solid organs to to hospitals nationwide, which requires safeguarding, collecting, testing, processing and storage that contribute to saving countless lives each year. With an increased need for this service, NHSBT recognised that effective technology was crucial for delivering a safe service for patients. Replacing an ageing infrastructure, migrating to cloud-based technology and replacing critical operational applications was the goal. This required careful consideration with regards to choosing the most efficient way of working, since so many other agencies were interdependent on the current infrastructure and the transformation was of a complex nature.

Adopting a scaled agile framework would allow them to implement the required systematic changes with minimal impact on the existing culture.

The challenges:

  • NHSBT needed to improve business processes and supporting IT environment, realigning infrastructure to cloud based technology
  • The project would also evaluate current IT systems in line with organisational needs
  • NHSBT were challenged to incorporate new technical platforms and architecture with minimal risk to management – the threat of effects on the culture of the organisation

The results:

  • The teams involved worked collaboratively to introduce solutions and training so internal changes were manageable and everybody was working from the same page
  • Introduced SAFe – Scaled Agile Framework: hands-on software delivery
  • A two day workshop to managers explained SAFe
  • Management were given definitive roles within SAFe
  • Planning sessions were organised across the larger organisation to explain SAFe to all employees
  • Developed and worked effectively as a team and projects delivered on time
  • Early delivery of significant business benefits  
  • Skillset and mindset for successful organisational change

Bitjam recognise the ways in which these modern working methods are highly adaptable and efficient, and have been adopting them across many projects for some time now. One example of where we used co-production with a client to create a project that was delivered on time and to a high standard, was Logga – a system for communicating timetables, homework and student progress in collaboration with Sixth Form College. We ran a number of design workshops with the students and set up beta testing groups via Android and the Apple app store. Meeting with teachers and admin staff weekly also contributed to the success of the project, as regular progress was updated and we were all given the opportunity to “give and get”. Read our case study for more details here.
In summary, the adoption of co-production within an agile framework for working, when applied within the public sector has some proven powerful benefits for improving efficiency with the NHS. It’s encouraging to see that the healthcare sector are trying and testing new and better ways of working in order to ultimately improve the end experience for patients, whilst upholding a duty of care to NHS staff who are subject to a fast-paced and evolving environment and need extra support from management during projects and changing processes.

team-work-agile-development
Co-production

Agile Development and Co-production

27 Apr, 2017

In the second part of our co-production series we take a look at Agile Development, another productivity tool that assists in changing the work based mindset and encouraging a more efficient approach to organisational development and changes.

The Shift From Sequential Processes to Agile Methodology

Agile methods encourage teams to build quickly, test what they’ve built and iterate their work based on regular feedback. It was introduced as a modern alternative to the traditional waterfall model.

The waterfall model is a sequential design process, in which progress is seen as flowing steadily downwards. It was used in software development processes, through the phases of conception, initiation, analysis, design, construction, testing, production, implementation and maintenance. Because it was created in a time when no formal software development methodologies existed, this hardware-oriented model was simply adapted for software development

The agile process takes a different approach. Gathering requirements, planning, designing, building and testing are conducted simultaneously. Starting small in the discovery and alpha phases make way for growing the project into something large-scale.

Benefits:

  • Productivity will improve as teams will quickly establish any challenges in certain areas of the project, since all elements are started together
  • The focus on the end users contributes to speed, value and efficiency as the team continuously have the experience in mind

Challenges:

  • Strong communication is required between stakeholders and business owners
  • The business needs to be able to adapt to changes within internal processes with minimal disruption

Co-Production in Agile Software Development

To recap from our previous blog post, co-production creates a collaborative eco-system in which all parties receive a balanced “give and get”.Similarly to agile development, it contributes to service provisions, which can have both benefits and implications. Working with end users, for example clinicians, patients or carers who can contribute regular ideas and feedback from the very end of the UX can speed up process. Distribution of power to citizens means sharing of the decision making process could actually cause delays in project productiveness, as contributors may be unable to agree upon certain elements of the tasks.
The adoption of co-production within an agile framework has some powerful benefits, and is a great example of the changing mindset within the public sector. It also provides a morale boost for teams, as they are able to achieve their goals efficiently and effectively. This is why bitjam favour such working techniques, as everybody involved – from the teams to the end user – can enjoy better ways of working. In the last of our 3 part series on co-production, we’ll take a look at a case study within an NHS department that trialed co-production and scaled agile development, and the benefits and results they received.